Journal Editor's Awards

  • International Journal of Climatology Editor's Award
  • Meteorological Applications Editors' Award
  • Atmospheric Science Letters Editors' Award
  • Quarterly Journal Editors' Award
  • Quarterly Journal Prize Reviewer's Certificate
  • Geoscience Data Journal Editors' Award

International Journal of Climatology Editor's Award

Dr Stephen Blenkinsop

Dr Stephen Blenkinsop

The International Journal of Climatology Prize is awarded to Dr Stephen Blenkinsop for paper “Quality-control of an hourly rainfall dataset and climatology of extremes for the UK” (Int. J. Climatol., 37, 2017, 722-740, doi: 10.1002/joc.4735), of which he is the first author, also considering several other papers published in the Journal to which the awardee has substantially contributed.

The major focus of Dr Blenkinsop’s research is on precipitation extremes. The paper for which he is awarded constitutes a pioneering work on subdaily precipitation events, which, despite great societal relevance due to their link to flash flooding particularly in urban areas, have been underexplored until recently. The paper describes production of the hourly precipitation dataset from about 1,600 stations covering the entire UK and its quality control. In this task, the authors led by Dr Blenkinsop faced many new challenges due to a very high spatial and temporal variability in comparison with common daily data. The dataset is then used to create the UK climatology of hourly precipitation with emphasis on extremes. The study is one of the first climatological analyses of subdaily precipitation on a national scale.

The impact of the paper is reflected in the fact that it has received almost 50 citations, thereby contributing to the high ranking of the Journal.

 

Acceptance message

I am honoured to accept the International Journal of Climatology Editor’s Award for 2020, and would like to thank the journal for the opportunity to publish my research on sub-daily rainfall extremes. Extreme rainfall has significant impacts on society and so the potential to develop our understanding of short duration, intense events and disseminate this work has been immensely rewarding. In particular, methods developed by our community of scientists to identify and eliminate errors in observational climate data may not necessarily generate headlines but underpins much of the work that does. It is therefore particularly pleasing that the journal recognises the role of work that improves the quality of our historical observations and so facilitate the understanding of our climate and how it is changing. As we continue to generate more and larger datasets, their quality should continue to be assessed and improved, and the journal is an important outlet for the dissemination of this research.

This work has not only contributed to an improved extreme rainfall climatology for the UK but also to a better understanding of the drivers of extremes, and is providing improved information for surface water and flood management. The knowledge and methods are now also being taken forward to provide global datasets and other associated products.

Finally, I would like to acknowledge the contributions of my co-authors and collaborators in this work, and especially the support of Professor Hayley Fowler.

 

Meteorological Applications Editors’ Award

Dr Lorenzo Giovannini

Dr Lorenzo Giovannini

This award recognises Dr Lorenzo Giovannini’s work as an Associate Editor of Meteorological Applications Journal. Dr Giovannini was one of the first Associate Editors that the new co-Editors-in-Chief invited to join them at the start of their term. In that time, he has been a reliable, enthusiastic and dedicated editor who has contributed in several important ways to the continued success of the journal. Not only did he handle a large number of manuscripts in the first year of his tenure, but he treated the content with care and integrity. His timeliness has also been exceptional for handling the manuscripts and guiding them through the review process to the decision point. In his second year as Associate Editor, he initiated and has co-organised a special issue “Mountain and Urban Meteorology” and will be contributing a review paper on “Innovative sensors for air quality measurement”.

His accomplishments so far and the plans he has put into action so quickly are helping the journal evolve faster than we anticipated. With his help, the co-Editors-in-Chief have been supported and the journal itself is being reshaped to fit a changing readership and author base.

 

Acceptance message

I am very honoured and grateful to receive the Meteorological Applications Editors’ Award for 2020. I joined the Journal's Editorial Board in 2019, as my first experience as Associate Editor. These two years have been very instructive for my professional growth from different perspectives. I have been learning so much not only from a scientific point of view, through the review process of many good papers in different fields, but also about the good practices for the management of a scientific journal, pushing towards increasingly higher standards of scientific quality and efficiency. I was impressed by the professionality and initiative of the journal staff: the editorial staff has always been helpful with organisation issues, while the Editorial Board meetings are a precious moment to discuss common issues on the peer-review process with colleagues, including important aspects such as equality and inclusivity. I have also to thank the Editors in Chief for their insightful suggestions when I was struggling with particularly challenging papers. Indeed, sometimes decisions are not easy, and I am therefore very pleased that my work has been appreciated. In particular, I am very happy to contribute to the improvement of the quality of Meteorological Applications in a period of important changes for the journal.

 

Atmospheric Science Letters Editors’ Award

Dr Chaofan Li

Dr Chaofan Li

Dr Chaofan Li receives this award in recognition for handling over 20 manuscripts since becoming an Associate Editor for Atmospheric Science Letters (ASL) 2 years ago. He commissions reviewers who provide high quality reviews and his turn around time with manuscripts is one of the best at ASL. Many of the manuscripts he handles progress to acceptance and result in high quality, well cited papers. His expertise in weather and climate dynamics with expertise in monsoons particularly in Asia has been invaluable to ASL especially given this area is a popular topic for which we receive many manuscripts.

We would like to thank Dr Chaofan Li for his continued commitment and enthusiasm for handling manuscripts for ASL.

 

Acceptance message

I am Chaofan Li, an associate professor in Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. I am working on climate dynamics and monsoon prediction. It is my great honor to be presented with the Atmospheric Science Letters Editors’ Award for 2020. I have been an Associate Editor of Atmospheric Science Letters since 2018. It is really a pleasure experience being an Associate Editor, which should be fair, objective, constructive, timely and ethical. During the review process, I feel quite happy to be involved in the scientific debates on different manuscripts, and to work with many passionate editors. Thanks for this approval and encouragement on my editorial work, it gives me a surprise. I also wish our journal will become better and better.

 

Quarterly Journal (QJ) Editors’ Award

Dr Tijana Janjić

Dr Tijana Janjić

Dr Tijana Janjić has been an Associate Editor with the Quarterly Journal for more than 7 years and has consistently handled one of the highest number of submissions, now exceeding 100 completed cases. She shows an efficient and professional approach, maintaining the highest standards in the review process and we are very fortunate to have her on the QJ editorial team.

Dr Janjić works in the area of data assimilation which has been the fastest expanding area in Quarterly Journal for more than a decade. In particular, she works at the cutting edge of convective scale data assimilation and its central importance for high resolution forecasting aimed at improving forecasts and warnings for high impact weather.

 

 

 

 

QJ Reviewer’s Certificate

Dr Michael Fischer

Dr Michael S. Fischer

Dr Michael Fischer receives this award in recognition of his important contribution as reviewer for the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. Michael has taken on a high number of reviews in the area of tropical cyclones, bringing his expertise in observations and modelling to the review process. His reviews have been thorough and their high quality was recognised by our Associate Editors at QJ.

We are pleased to have this opportunity to show our appreciation for his valued contribution in maintaining the high quality of papers in the Quarterly Journal.

Acceptance message

It is a great honour to have been awarded one of the Quarterly Journal Prize Reviewer’s Certificates for 2020. The peer review process is a critical component in the advancement of our science. Although the process comes with the burden of ensuring the quality and clarity of the science is maximized, I find performing peer reviews to be a rewarding experience as it allows me to learn about cutting-edge research as well as new and effective ways to communicate. Sometimes the time-consuming nature of performing reviews can overshadow the rewarding aspects, so I sincerely appreciate that the Quarterly Journal has such awards to recognize the effort put into the review process. I would like to thank the editors at the Quarterly Journal for this recognition and look forward to continue serving as a reviewer for such an excellent journal.

 

Dr Laure Raynaud

Dr Laure Raynaud

Dr Laure Raynaud receives this award in recognition of her important contribution as reviewer for the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. Laure has taken on a high number of reviews spanning a range of topics relating to ensemble forecasting and novel methods in forecast evaluation. She takes a rigorous approach to review and also has a commendable turnaround time on reviews.

We are pleased to have this opportunity to show our appreciation for her valued contribution in maintaining the high quality of papers in the Quarterly Journal.

Acceptance message

I am honoured and grateful to receive the Quarterly Journal Prize Reviewer's Certificate for 2020. Peer review is a very important task and it's been a pleasure to contribute to the publication of high-level research works. I warmly thank the whole editorial team for giving me the opportunity to review exciting manuscripts in my expertise area. I really look forward to continue working with the Quarterly Journal in the future.

 

Geoscience Data Journal Editors’ Award

Dr Philip Craig and Professor Ed Hawkins

Dr Philip Craig

Professor Ed Hawkins

Philip Craig and Ed Hawkins are awarded jointly for their paper “Digitizing observations from the Met Office Daily Weather Reports for 1900–1910 using citizen scientist volunteers”, which was published in the Geoscience Data Journal in 2020.

The study digitalized 1.8 million sub-daily and daily weather observations across Europe recorded in the UK Met Office during the 1900-1910 period. This is one of the largest weather data recovery efforts by citizen scientists. The rescued observations are valuable for filling gaps in the existing weather records. This paper is expected to have a large impact on the research community and become a model for citizen science data rescue.

Acceptance message

We are very grateful to accept the Geoscience Data Journal Editors’ Award for our paper describing the dataset of pressure, temperature and rainfall observations recovered from the 1900-1910 Daily Weather Reports. This work would not have been possible without the dedication of the 2148 volunteers who spent countless hours digitizing the Daily Weather Reports for the Weather Rescue citizen science project. Data Rescue is a growing field that requires a lot of time, patience and attention to detail with input from many different people to achieve the best results.

So far, the data recovered from the 1900-1910 Daily Weather Reports have been incorporated into the Copernicus Data Rescue Service for future use in reanalysis projects and into the Met Office’s Had-UK Grid dataset to provide improved spatial coverage of rainfall observations in this time period. Some examples in our paper have demonstrated the benefits of recovering historical weather data with particular reference to some notable events in 1903! We hope that our work can motivate further data rescue efforts around the world and we are currently working on preparing more data for publication in the near future.